An historical account of all the voyages round the world, performed by English navigators; including those lately undertaken by order of His present Majesty. The whole faithfully extracted from the journals of the voyagers. ... In four volumes.: [pt.4]

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AN HISTORICAL ACCOUNT OF ALL THE VOYAGES ROUND THE WORLD, PERFORMED BY ENGLISH NAVIGATORS; [...] UNDERTAKEN By ORDER of his PRESENT MAJESTY.

[...] WHOLE faithfully Extracted from the JOURNALS of the VOYAGERS
  • [...]KE, under [...] in [...]
  • C [...]VEND [...], 158 [...] ▪88
  • COWL [...]Y, 16 [...]3▪86
  • D [...]PIER, [...]
  • COO [...]E, 1708▪ [...]
  • ROGER [...], 170 [...]-1 [...]
  • C [...]IPP [...]TON and SHE [...]V [...], 1719▪22
  • [...]ON [...]taken in 17 [...] ▪44
  • BYRON, 1764▪ [...]
  • W [...], 17 [...]- [...]
  • [...] 1 [...] [...]
  • [...]d CO [...] [...]8▪ [...]

TOGETHER WITH That of SYDNEY PARKINSON, Dr [...]ftſman to JOSEPH BANKS, Eſq who circumn [...]ted the Globe w [...]th Capt. COOK, in h [...]s Majeſt [...]s Ship the ENDEAVOUR.

[...] The Voyage of Monſ. B [...]VILLE [...]nd the World, Performed by Order of the [...]nch King.

[...]uſ [...]ed with Map [...] Cha [...], and H [...]ical P [...]

To which [...] APPENDIX [...] the JOURNA [...] of a V [...]YAGE to the NORTH POLE by the Hon. Com [...]dore PHIPPS, and Captain LUTWIDGE

VOLUME THE FOURTH.

LONDON. [...] Corner of St. Paul's Church-Yard. MDCC [...]X [...]III.

3. THE BOOKSELLER'S ADVERTISEMENT. TO THE READER.

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HAVING in the former part of this Collection given an authentic account of the proceedings and diſcoveries of the Engliſh navigators who have lately ſurrounded the globe; and alſo a copious detail of the voyage of a cotemporary navigator of another nation, who, jealous of the Engliſh deſigns, was commiſſioned to follow the ſame track. That the preſent undertaking may not want novelty to recommend it, I have procured, at a conſiderable expence, the journal of a new voyage to the northern part of the globe; a voyage which his Majeſty, in a particular manner, has thought fit to patronize, and which was equipped with ſuch care and circumſpection, that nothing was found wanting during the courſe of it.

This voyage I have added by way of Supplement, without any additional expence to the ſubſcribers; and have prefixed to it a brief recapitulation of the many attempts that have been made for the diſcovery of a north-eaſt paſſage to China and Japan, and alſo have ſubjoined a like ſummary of the enterprizes ſet on foot by government, or undertaken by private adventurers, for diſcovering a communication with the great pacific ocean by a paſſage from the north-weſt.

[Page] Theſe accounts are full of aſtoniſhing events, and wonderful deſcriptions of uncommon phenomena. In them we read of rivers and lakes of ice, burſting with impriſoned vapours; and of rocks, foreſts, beams of houſes and buildings, ſplitting with a noiſe not leſs terrible than the loudeſt thunder.—Of brandy, Brine, and even ſpirits of wine, expoſed to the open air, only for a few hours, freezing into a ſolid maſs.—Of mountains of ice frozen in the ſea one hundred fathom deep.—Of ſnow hills that never thaw.—And of winds that bliſter the fleſh, and ſhrivel the ſkin like red-hot iron.

In this Supplement the diſtreſſes, dangers, providential deliverances, and unſpeakable ſufferings of thoſe who have wintered in the dark and dreary regions of the north, are recounted with clearneſs and brevity; and, in the ſmall compaſs of a few ſheets, the contents of many volumes are comprized.

FINIS.
Notes
*.
M. Bougainville every where calls theſe iſlands the Iſles Mal [...]u [...]es; but we ſhall call them by the name of Falkland's Iſlands, which was given them by our countryman, Strong, in 1689.
*.
This deſcription will, of courſe, be found when we come to give an account of that voyage.
*.
Cape Fendu, in the original.
†.
Longue Rue.