Ye true-born Englishmen proceed: Our trifling crimes detect, ...

1.

[Page 1]
1.
YE True-Born Engliſhmen proceed,
Our trifling Crimes detect,
Let the Poor ſtarve, Religion bleed,
The Dutch be damn'd, the French ſucceed,
And all by your Neglect.
2.
Your actions all the World diſguſt,
The French are only glad,
Your friends your honeſty diſtruſt,
And while you think you're wiſe and juſt,
The Nation thinks you mad.
3.
Are theſe the ways your wiſdom take,
To raiſe our reputation?
To quarrel at a few miſtakes,
Whilſt France their own advantage makes,
And Laughs at all the Nation.
4.
You are the People who of old
The Nations Troops disbanded,
And now you ſhould your Friends uphold,
Your Friends and you are bought and ſold,
As always was intended.
5.
There's none but Fools in time to come,
Will Truſt the Engliſh Nation;
For if they do, they know their doome,
That we'l be falling out at home,
And baulk their Expectation.
6.
You are the Nations grand defence,
Againſt Illegal power,
And yet againſt both Law and Sence,
And ſometimes too without pretence,
You ſend folk to the Tower.
7.
Some Lords your anger have incurr'd,
For Treaty of Partition,
But if you'l take the Nations word,
Moſt People think it was abſurd,
And empty of diſcretion.
8.
[...] if that Treaty as 'tis fam'd,
Gave part of Spain to Gaul,
Why ſhould thoſe Gentlemen be blam'd,
When you your ſelves are not [...]
To let them take it all.
9.
Bribes and ill practices you found,
And ſome few felt your power,
But ſoon you run your ſelves aground,
For had you puſh'd the matter round,
You all had gone to th' Tower.
10.
Some Reformation hath from you,
In vain been long expected,
But when you ſhou'd the buſineſs do,
Your private quarrels you purſue,
And th' Nation lies neglelcted.
[Page 2] 11.
Long has the Kingdom born the weight
Of your deficient Funds,
That Parliamentary publique cheat,
Pray where's the difference of that
And Plundering with Dragoons?
12.
Are you the People that complain
Of Arbitrary Power?
Then ſhew the Nation if you can,
Where Kings have been ſince Kings began,
Such Tyrants as you are.
13.
When Kings with right and Law diſpence,
And ſet up Power deſpotick,
It has been counted Law and ſence
To take up Arms againſt our Prince,
And call in aids Exotick.
14.
But you, although your Powers depend
On every Plowman's Vote,
Beyond the Law that Power extend,
To ruine thoſe you ſhould defend,
And ſell the Power you bought.
15.
The King Religion did Commend
To you his Law-Explainors,
We know not what you may intend,
Nor how you ſhould Religion mend,
Unleſs you will your Manners.
16.
You are the Nations darling Sons,
The abſtract of our Mobb,
For City Knights and Wealthy Clowns,
Stock Jobbers, Stateſmen and Buffoons,
You may defye the Globe.
17.
Toland inſults the Holy Ghoſt,
Brib'd S—r bribes accuſes,
Good Manners and Religion's loſt,
The King who was your Lord of Hoſt,
The Raskal H—w abuſes.
18.
Your Stateſman G—lle with intent
To Cultivate with care,
The dignity of Parliament
Plyes cloſely at the Dancing tent,
And manages May-Fair.
19.
The True-Born Heroes diligence
For publique good appears,
There he refines his Wit and Senſe,
That the next day in our defence
May fill Committee Chairs.
20.
The limitation of the Crown
Is your Immediate care,
If your Wiſe Articles go down,
Your Power will be ſo Lawleſs grown,
'Tis no matter who's the Heir.
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Did we for this depoſe our Prince,
And Liberty aſſume,
That you ſhould with our Laws diſpenſe,
Commit Mankind without Offence,
And Govern in his room?
22.
You ſhou'd find out ſome other word
To give the Crowns Accepter,
To call him King wou'd be abſurd,
For tho' he'l ſeem to wear the Sword,
'Tis You have got the Scepter.
23.
And now your wrath is ſmoaking hot
Againſt the Kent Petition,
No man alive can tell for what
But telling Truths which pleas'd you not,
And taxing your Diſcretion.
24.
If you thoſe Gentlemen detain
By your unbounded Power,
'Tis hop'd you'l never more complain
Of Biſhops in King James's Reign,
Sent blindly to the Tower.
25.
A ſtrange Memorial too there came,
Your Members to affront,
Which told you Truths you dare not name,
And ſo the Paper ſcap'd the Flame,
Or elſe it had been burnt.
26.
Some ſaid the Language was ſevere,
And into Paſſion flew,
Some too began to curſe and ſwear,
And call'd the Author Mutineere,
But all men ſaid 'Twas True.
27.
But oh! the Conſternation now
In which you all appear!
'Tis plain from whence your terrours flew,
For had your guilt been leſs you knew,
So would have been your fear.
28.
In Fifteen Articles you're told
You have our Rights betray'd,
Banter'd the Nation, bought and ſold
The Liberties you ſhou'd uphold;
No wonder you're afraid.
29.
And now to make your ſelves appear
The more Impertinent,
A wiſe Addreſs you do prepare,
To have his Majeſty take care
Rebellion to prevent.
30.
No doubt his Majeſty will pleaſe
To take your Cauſe in hand,
Beſides the work is done with eaſe,
Full Seven Thouſand Men he has
The Nation to defend.
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One hundred Thouſand Heroes more
Do our Train'd Bands compoſe,
If foraign Forces ſhou'd come or're,
Plant them and you upon the Shoar,
How bravely you'l oppoſe.
32.
Then bluſh ye Senators to ſee
How all men ſtand diſmay'd,
The Nation ſhou'd ſo patient be,
To bear with all your Villany,
And ſee themſelves betray'd.
33.
It was our Freedom to defend,
That We the People choſe you,
And We the People do pretend
Our power of Chooſing may extend
To puniſh and depoſe you.
34.
For ſince in vain our Hopes and Fears,
Petitions too are vain,
No Remedy but this appears,
To pull the Houſe about your Ears,
And ſend you home again.
35.
Theſe are the Nations Diſcontents,
The Cauſes are too true,
The Ploughman now his Choice repents,
For tho he values Parliaments,
He's out of Love with You.
36.
When to be choſe with Caps in hand
You courted every Voice,
You were our Servants at command,
By which it ſeems you underſtand,
Untill we made our Choice.
37.
If that be True, we let you know
Upon that very ſcore,
You'd beſt your preſent Hours beſtow
In all the Miſchiefs you can do,
For We'l ne're chooſe you more.
FINIS.